What can a registered interior designer do for you?

That’s a great question. Clients I work with often wonder what a registered interior designer (RID) does that’s different from other designers. It’s complicated so let me simplify and offer some insight so when you decide you need an interior designer for your project, you will be well informed and make a good choice based on your needs.

Anyone can call themselves an interior designer. There are of course certified kitchen and bath designers, interior decorators and stagers who provide interior design services, but to become a registered interior designer requires a formal interior design degree from an accredited institution, a 2 year apprenticeship, and passing the professional examination (similar to the architectural exam) — the National Certification of Interior Design Qualifications (NCIDQ). This is a long process, allowing RIDs to stamp construction drawings for permitting. This is one of the major differences between registered interior designers and other interior designers and decorators. Of course there are other paths that designers can follow but the RID path is the most involved, most technical and requires the most education. A very small percentage of interior designers are actually registered with the state of Texas.

Why is this an important distinction? RIDs can develop construction documents, meet regulations and building codes requirements, and apply sustainable design principles, as well as the manage and coordinate other professional services including mechanical, electrical, plumbing, – all to ensure that people can work, live, and learn in an aesthetically pleasing, and safe environment.

RIDs have mastered the ability to understand people’s behavior in order to create functional and beautiful spaces down to last adorning detail including, furniture, window treatments and art and accessories. RIDs work with architects on new construction, design remodels, relocate plumbing, and electrical, and design kitchen and baths. Just like doctors, lawyers and architects, registered interior designers must complete 12 hours of continuing education every year so they are current on both technical (codes, universal & sustainable design) and design trends.

RIDs can help save you time and money with their extensive knowledge and an array of resources – they are not typically tied to any one product or manufacturer. RIDs are client focused not product focused.

Creating a mindful and appropriate solution for a space for any use takes knowledge and an understanding of human nature that goes beyond the selection of color palettes and furnishings. If you want a collaboration that allows the best possible options for you, hire a registered interior designer for your next design project and you’ll be glad you did.

Cristie Schlosser, principal and owner of Schlosser Design Group, LLC has been practicing interior design for 18 years. She is a professional member of ASID and the 2015-2016 ASID Texas Chapter Dallas Design Community Chair. Cristie has won numerous awards and is a member of NARI, NKBA and USGBC.

Reinventing Light

It’s easy to convert existing down lighting to LED by using retrofit kits from companies like Nora lighting. Companies such as Phillips and Toshiba have designed LED lamps that screw in to A19 sockets and MR16 low voltage. These are two great ways to incorporate LEDs into your existing lighting without a great deal of expense. We use LED lighting for general illumination, accent and task lighting as in under cabinet illumination, bathrooms, chandeliers and cove lighting when specifying new lighting fixtures. Currently we are designing a new construction residential project with 100% Energy efficient lighting. LEDs come in a variety of color temperatures and their CRI ratings are very good, in the high eighties which is much better than fluorescent. When selecting LED lamps, pay attention to the lumens vs. the wattage. – See more at: http://schlosserdesign.net/reinventing-light/#sthash.jk52JABa.dpuf

Aging with Elegance

Traditionally, growing older is associated with hospitals, nursing homes, or institutionalized equipment for those who choose to continue living at home. However, this is 2014! Forget everything you think you know about disability-friendly bathrooms. There are many more options these days for people who want to live comfortably in their home as they age.

Old bathroom equipment Seliger, Susan. Bathroom Equipment. Photograph. 14 Jan. 2014. Preparing for a Loved One to Die at Home. The New York Times. Web. 1 Mar. 2014.

Old bathroom equipment
Seliger, Susan. Bathroom Equipment. Photograph. 14 Jan. 2014. Preparing for a Loved One to Die at Home. The New York Times. Web. 1 Mar. 2014.

Walk In Tub. Photograph. N.d. Walk In Tub Installation. Ameriglide. Web. 1 Mar. 14.

Walk In Tub. Photograph. N.d. Walk In Tub Installation. Ameriglide. Web. 1 Mar. 14.

Modernized equipment allows for a seamless look in the home. Just because we grow old doesn’t mean our house has to reflect it! One of these great advancements is a ADA (American Disabilities Act) compliant tub from Kohler. Typical walk-in tubs can take up to 15 minutes to fill and drain. That’s a long time to be just sitting in the shower, waiting for a warm bath! The new Elevance series in the Kohler collection solves this problem stylishly and efficiently. Instead of the swinging door that most walk-in tubs use, these tubs have a rising side wall that is pulled up once you are seated on the wheelchair height bench. While this setup allows you to get out of the tub much quicker, they also went to the added conveniences of a dual draining system and heated seating. Bonus- it doesn’t look ugly! Check out this beautiful bathroom full of Kohler appliances:

Kohler ADA Compliant Products

Kohler ADA Compliant Products

Kohler

Kohler Elevance Series

One last cool new gadget that can be useful for refrigerated medicine is the M Series Cold Storage medicine cabinet from Robern. Now you can keep all of your medication together instead of making the long trek to the kitchen! This cabinet is a trendy solution for bathrooms. It fits seamlessly into the overall look of the room.

Robern M Series Cold Storage Medicine Cabinet

Robern M Series Cold Storage Medicine Cabinet

Accessories finish out any room! Check out these photos of grab bars (and more!) from Moen:

Iso collection from Moen

Iso collection Kingsley collection from MoenKingsley collection

Sage collection Brushed nickel mirror

Sage collection
Brushed nickel mirror

Eva collection Brushed nickel towel shelf

Eva collection
Brushed nickel towel shelf

 

Bathroom Therapy

The bathroom has evolved from a simple place to take care of business to a place expected to be serene and relaxing, much like a spa. People love to spend hours lounging in the tub or singing in the shower. As the demand for these luxury spaces increases, the variety of options explodes to meet the wants of the people.

Many people are already aware of the hydrotherapy options that are available, including bubbles or jets in whirlpool baths. Another less well known (but equally relaxing) option in tubs is heat. Several companies have combined these two therapies to create a bath that is even more luxurious. Most recently, music therapy has been integrated into bathing systems. Kohler has a new tub in their VibrAcoustic collection that uses Bluetooth technology to take advantage of the relaxation caused by music. Through the Bluetooth integrated into the bath system, your smart phone hooks up to the tub, allowing you to create a giant speaker out of the empty basin, or fill the bath and allow the vibrations to soothe your body. Lastly, there in an increased use of chromatherapy, added lighting in the bath to make the mood. With the wide variety of therapies available through tubs, you can choose your favorites and let the stress float away.

Kohler VibrAcoustics Tub

Kohler VibrAcoustics Tub

More trendy features that can help create a spa-like environment in your bathroom are bamboo backsplash tiling, large, heated tile flooring, natural paint colors, frameless glass showers, and polished nickel features.

Bamboo-style tile from Walker Zanger

Bamboo-style tile from Walker Zanger
From the Skyline collection

Schlosser Design Group Large tiles

Schlosser Design Group
Large tiles

IMG_0234

Schlosser Design Group
Large tiled shower

Having a clean, spa-like bathroom can positively affect your health and attitude. You will feel like you can relax, slow down, and enjoy the time your spend in your personal oasis.

Blurred Lines

Written by Cristie Schlosser

As I draw close to the completion of my own project, it has never been clearer to me how the industry and disciplines fit together. The past two years, I’ve been both the client and the Interior Designer. Of course, my husband Rodney is the real client, but I’ve chosen to play that role as well. My goal, when Rodney suggested we “build,” was to put together a “team” that could collaborate to design the home we plan to live in for the next phase of our lives together. Not only would this “team” collaborate, but also to have others to bounce my thoughts and ideas off of and get professional feedback was critical. I’ve enjoyed the process. I’m anxious for the completion and the results. I believe my shortcomings have challenged me to change the way I work, to improve my process, and to rise to a new level of expertise. I have come a long way, but have much further to go. I am a perfectionist to some degree – always thinking I can do better.

The blurred lines became apparent to me in multiple ways. Not only am I am the client and the interior designer, but I usually work on behalf of the homeowner to manage the contractor. I am also the project manager placing orders and following up on deliveries – in new construction this in normally done by the contractor. I am used to working with my own trades, many of which in this case our contractor uses. Funny thing is I had no prior experience with the architects or the contractor. In some ways, the blurred lines worked to our advantage. In other ways, it has been more difficult for the architects, the contractor, and me; but most importantly, I really enjoyed designing with this team. Putting all typical home building frustrations aside, I know we will be pleased with the outcome.

For as long as the industry has existed, there have been blurred lines between registered Architects (RA) and registered Interior Designers (RID). Both are creative and have vision. Both create design drawings and stamp drawings for construction purposes. RAs and RIDs can create lighting, plumbing, and electrical plans.

They can space plan and layout the flow and interior non-load barring walls of a structure. Both can specify finish materials, cabinet details, and interior millwork. Both can complete a built space with furniture and decoration.

So what’s the difference? Each discipline specializes in their specific area of expertise, which requires rigorous education, apprentice work, and intensive board testing. An architect’s area of expertise is the building systems and how the structure is melded into the environment. An interior designer’s area of expertise is a psychological examination of human nature and needs as they are affected by the built environment.

So where do contractors and designers (non-registered) fit into the picture? Contractors execute the design vision as it pertains to construction, and designers adorn and beautify spaces that require no building modifications. There is no education requirement, licensing, or maintenance of continuing education. There is no ruling body mandating regulations. There are great contractors who are very responsible and run impressive operations. Generally, these contractors are members of organizations that require CEUs and have certified programs. NARI is an example of such an organization. Some contractors are as naturally talented as some RAs and RIDs. Decorators who call themselves interior designers don’t quite understand the meaning of the term. They aren’t trying to mislead; they simply don’t realize what the big deal is. There are plenty of non-qualified talented designers whose experience counts. However, there are plenty that don’t know what the codes are, or how to resolve construction complications. Their role is to make selections that beautify the interiors. That’s just plain decorating.

So you get the idea now; there are plenty of people vying for your business. How do you know whom to choose? It certainly depends on your project, but the best results come from a collaborative effort. Respect between the disciplines and working together to create your dream home or office. Starting with your design team will lead you down the right path and through the process that flushes out the options and creates a unique space for you.

Silk of the Future

What is stronger than Kevlar, more rare than a four leaf clover, and shines like an Olympic gold medal? A textile made entirely of spider silk. On display at the American Museum of Natural History, this incredible piece took four years and over one million spiders to create. Although the title of “largest textile made of spider silk” now belongs to an embroidered cape, this cloth measures 11’ by 4’, not something to laugh at!

Displaying Old Kevlar Vest.jpg

Testing of an old Kevlar vest
“Bullet-Proof Vest Testing.” Silodrome, 2014. Digital file.

Current Kevlar vest
Quick, J. L. “A Better Bulletproof Vest.” Bob Johnson’s Toughbook Stuff, 2012. Digital file.

Displaying Close Up Spider Silk.jpg

The edge of the spider silk textile found in the American Museum of Natural History
Leggett, Hadley. “1 Million Spiders Make Golden Silk for Rare Cloth.” Wired, 2009. Digital file.

The full textile
Leggett, Hadley. “1 Million Spiders Make Golden Silk for Rare Cloth.” Wired, 2009. Digital file.

Displaying Spider Silk Cape.jpg

Spider Silk Cape
“A Gold Silk Cape Made By Millions of Rare Spiders.” LuxuryLaunches, 2006. Digital file.

So, if this material is so strong, why don’t we use it for everything? Well, the reason the production took four years is because one spider can only produce a certain amount of silk at one time!

But…What if it could be created synthetically? It’s not out of the question; nylon was developed as a substitute for silk. All that needs to happen is for one person to have an idea.

That’s where Randy Lewis comes in. This professor transplanted a gene from the silk-producing spiders into several goats. A mutation of sorts is created, and the milk taken from the goats contains an extra protein. The protein is extracted from the milk through a several processes, one of which involves taking the fat out of the milk. Eventually, the protein is concentrated enough that it can be used to create spider silk. The liquid protein is then slowly injected into alcohol, causing the protein to solidify and form silk.

The big question now would be: “Is the process worth it?” Right now, one quart of milk creates a vial of the protein that can make a silk strand 2-3 meters long. Those aren’t fabulous stats, but Mr. Lewis hopes that as the goats keep reproducing, the protein content of the milk will jump from 2% to 10%. Who knows, perhaps in the future we will be able to afford textiles created from these special spider-goats.

For more on the spider silk, follow the link below.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYlkJyG1Oik&feature=player_detailpage

Defy Convention This Spring

Written by Amy Tran

At SDG, we are ecstatic over the refreshing yet rebellious color palette for this spring. In 2014, there is a powerful balance between vivid and fearless hues paired with subdued and calming pastels. Normally these colors are not paired together. They are defying convention, and we are in love.

Eye Pleaser:

SpringPalette_Page_1

This palette includes vibrant yellows and blues, along with the color of the year Radiant Orchid. These are balanced with soft mints, sandy taupes, lazy blues and a hint of pepper with subdued reds and oranges.

Objects of Our Affection:

The Dacey Stool
This fun seat adds sunshine and conversation into any room.
Designed by Arteriors Home

  From our pals at Sherwin Williams, we used to Color Visualizer to make these Fun Scenes:

blue room

SW 6212 Quietude, SW 6886 Invigorate, SW 6509 Georgian Bay

orange room

SW 7620 Seaworthy, SW 6237 Dark Night, SW 7695 Mesa Tan, SW 6615 Peppery

Here is a sample of these new color palettes at play featuring recently designed rooms we just completed for one of our clients.  The girls loved their “new looks”!

2014-01-27 23 copy

2014-01-27 17 copy

Dusy Plum, Cream & Gold

Design & Color Trends
Last summer while traveling in Europe, dusty mid-tones and pale colors saturated the showrooms.  You may have seen our Facebook post with the images I took.  Then in late summer, Sherwin-Williams presented Color Trends 2014 featuring Exclusive Plum SW 6263.   With Exclusive Plum painted walls and accented plum table cloths, layering the color of the year throughout the room was simply exquisite.
Plum has always been a favorite of mine and especially this grayed tone which provides a neutral backdrop to most colors found in nature.  There is a subtlety and richness without being overbearing.  Plums work just as well with brown, green and fuchsia as with cream and gold.  I found this color story quite timely, as we had just planned our clients living room using cool grey walls, warm wood floors, plum, lilac, silver and gold iridescent fireplace tile surround with a beige sofa and brass accents.  Follow us on Facebook to see the photos later this year.  In the meantime…check out these available pieces below.
V250671S.JPG basset furn
Pillow from Basset
thayer-coggin-hero__banner
Thayer-Coggin
HarveyProbberPlumChairs_l
Harvey Probber Chairs from 1stdibs.com

Not Your Grandmother’s Chantilly

August 2013


written by Amy Tran

This is not your grandmother’s Chantilly; this season lace is a staple. Bedding, wall covering, and rug patterns to dresses, shoes and nail design, retailers are a huge fan in both home décor and women’s apparel. Lace in black or dark colors creates a demure and sultry vibe; white or beige gives lace a crisp innocence that everyone can appreciate.