A Master Bathroom Renovation Timeline

Remodeling a master bathroom is a big home improvement project that can take months, depending on the updates. Each renovation that I complete with my clients is unique, however, I like to provide them with an estimated timeline when we first begin working together.

A major master bathroom remodel can take anywhere from six to 10 weeks, depending on the project size, and involves three phases: planning, construction and finishing. If you hire an interior design firm like Schlosser Design Group, you won’t have to worry about managing any of the details during this hectic process. Completing a renovation project yourself could take much longer if you’re unfamiliar with architecture, design and construction.

Planning Phase

The planning phase typically takes one to two weeks and consists of:

  • Designing — Your interior designer will work with an architect or general contractor to create blueprints for your new space. From there, they’ll also create a mood board to show off the new design style for your approval.
  • Sourcing — Your designer will begin sourcing the required materials like flooring, tile, countertops, plumbing fixtures, lighting and accents, and will also source any furnishings and accessories that may be needed to complete the space.
  • Homeowner Prep — You’ll pack away all of your belongings so construction can begin.

Construction Phase

The construction phase is the longest part of the process and typically takes four to six weeks, but can extend even longer if a problem is uncovered during demolition. Construction consists of:

  • Demolition — Before picking up the sledgehammer, your contractor should prepare your home for the upcoming mess. Installing extra air filters on the HVAC and zipper doors around the room should keep the rest of your home tidy. Next, the team can strip back the room to the studs. Demo typically takes three or four days to complete.
  • Plumbing and Electricity — Plumbers and electricians move or add pipework and wiring.
  • Walls — Walls are erected. This process spans framing, insulation, putting up drywall and skim coating.
  • Tile — Tiling for walk-in showers, tub surrounds and sink backsplashes happens next. If you’re also getting a tile floor, the wall tiling will be completed first.
  • Flooring — Flooring is laid.
  • Cabinetry — Bathroom cabinets and countertops are installed.
  • Plumbing Fixtures — Plumbing fixtures like toilets, sinks, showerheads and tubs are installed.
Tiling is part of any construction phase

Tiling is a key part of any construction phase, but especially in this master ensuite. I designed this walk-in shower to be a luxurious and spacious retreat for my clients.

Finishing Phase

The finishing phase typically takes one to two weeks and consists of:

  • Accents and Finishes — With the bulk of the work done, the construction team will start to put the finishing touches on the bathroom. This includes adding hardware to drawers and cabinets, installing custom closets, hanging mirrors and putting up light fixtures.
  • Paint — The room is painted.
  • Cleaning and Staging — The construction crew will clean the space and remove all of their materials before handing it over to the interior design team. The design team will add all the final touches like rugs, towels and art before the final reveal.
Arranging accents and making sure everything looks perfect

During the finishing phase I get my hands dirty in the client’s space, arranging accents and making sure everything looks perfect.

See an SDG Renovation Behind The Scenes

In the third video of my SDG Renovation series, I take you on-site at my client’s master bathroom remodel. You’ll see what their home looks like while workers are updating the space, how the home is kept clean, and how designs can change once demolition is complete. If you want the full context of the project, be sure to go back and watch Episode One first.

Quartz Countertop Vocabulary

If you’re not an experienced interior designer, talking about bathroom or kitchen countertops can be like speaking a foreign language. Veining, movement, porosity… what does it all mean? This is my cheat-sheet to understanding the professional lingo when choosing a stone countertop.

Edge Profile – The shape of the edge of the countertop. There are many different edge styles to choose from, like flat, bullnose, beveled and quarter round.

Engineered Stone – Countertops that are man-made from combining quartz with binders. These countertops look like natural stone but allow the manufacturers to have more control over what the finished product looks like. Engineered stone is more consistent than natural stone because it is manufactured instead of mined.

Fading – When a stone loses color after being exposed to sunlight.

Movement – A unique pattern that flows through a slab. Movement is the opposite of uniformity or consistency.

Non-Porous – A surface that does not have holes in it, so it does not absorb air and moisture. Non-porous surfaces are ideal for countertops because they do not need to be sealed. Most engineered stones are non-porous.

Porous – A surface that has microscopic holes in it, allowing it to absorb air and moisture. If a porous stone is used for a countertop, it must be sealed. Most natural stones are porous.

Sealing – The process of putting a clear coat on top of the stone to protect it from stains. Sealing is especially useful for porous stones.

Slab – A large, flat piece of stone. Stone countertops are made from slabs of either natural or engineered stone.

Veining – Long, thin strips of contrasting color in a countertop slab. Depending on how a slab is cut — either with the vein or across it — the veining can appear swirled and cloudy, or distinct and linear.

Faint veining - engineered stone

This faint veining in this engineered stone picks up on the soft wood tones from the custom cabinets. Design by Schlosser Design group.

Watch Behind The Scenes

In the second video of my four-part series SDG Renovation, I take you behind the scenes as I select an engineered quartz countertop for my clients. To learn more about the project I’m selecting countertops for, go back and watch Episode One.

Beautiful engineered stone

In my video, you’ll see how I selected this beautiful engineered stone for my client’s master bathroom. Design by Schlosser Design Group.

5 Signs Your Master Bathroom Needs a Renovation

A master bedroom suite should be tranquil and relaxing, but an outdated and poorly functioning master bathroom can make it feel exactly the opposite. Bathroom renovations are the answer — when renovating, you can wipe the slate clean on your bathroom and start fresh with a space that is beautiful, functional and safe.

These Five Issues Should be Red Flags and Help You Know if it’s Time to Renovate Your Master Retreat.


Electrical Hazards

Water and electricity are a dangerous combination. If your bathroom has electrical outlets, switches or lights too close to bathtubs, showers or sinks, you could be at risk of electrocution.

Lack of Privacy

Privacy is important in any bathroom, but especially in a master suite when the space serves multiple functions and two people may be using it at the same time. The ideal master bathroom should have a separate water closet, or W.C., for the toilet.

Poor Storage

Cabinet space, linen closets and vanities, among other types of storage, are important for master bathrooms to fully serve the homeowner. Depending on when your home was built, it may not make the best use of space to maximize storage for towels, makeup, hair products and other bathroom supplies.

Storage Closet by Schlosser Design Group

Storage is a critical part of any master bedroom suite. If your closet doesn’t have ample room to keep your clothes and shoes organized, it might be time for an update. Design by Schlosser Design Group.

Incomplete Design

All spaces in the home should be well-planned so they are both functional and beautiful. Sometimes one of these features is missing, however, causing a design to be incomplete. For example, I recently redesigned a master bathroom that was using a shower curtain with a walk-in shower stall because it did not have a door.

Shower redesign by Schlosser Design Group

Before our renovation, my client’s master shower was incomplete because it used a shower curtain in a standing shower stall. Schlosser Design Group redesigned the space to increase the size of the shower and add a glass door.

Poor Ventilation

Ventilation is a key part of proper bathroom construction because it prevents a buildup of moisture and humidity in the space. If left unvented, mold or mildew can grow in your bathroom. While some older homes don’t have ventilation at all, others vent improperly into the attic rather than directly outside through an exterior wall or the roof. It’s crucial that bathroom steam does not get released into the attic because it can cause the roof framing to rot.

Watch SDG Behind The Scenes

Recently, one of my clients tasked me with renovating their master bathroom, which you can see in my new video series SDG Renovation. In Episode One, I walk you through their existing bathroom and all of the functional and safety problems that existed.